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Chopped hinges in at an angle?

by Mike
(UK)

I am replacing a door which the previous carpenter has chopped hinges at an angle for. Although flush to start they go deeper into the door the further away from the edge of the door they are. The idea seems to be to have the hinges slightly ajar when the door is closed. I can’t think of a reason for this. Both rebates are identical, so it’s by design. Can you think of a reason why this has been done?

Thanks,
Mike

Comments for Chopped hinges in at an angle?

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Apr 14, 2018
Thanks Gary NEW
by: Mike

I don’t remember the screws being other than flush when I removed the hinges (which I have cleaned up and will reuse) so must be one of the other reasons you suggested. Hopefully it will just be a preference rather than a twisted frame ! I’ll soon find out as I will be hanging the replacement door next week and will bear your helpful comments and alternative reasons for doing this in mind.

I have only made two doors before so your advice is much appreciated.

Thanks again.
Mike

Apr 05, 2018
Chopping hinges into a door and frame
by: Gary

Hi Mike.
This isn’t always required but I think the reason for this is to prevent the door or hinge from binding (sticking, so when closing the door it tries to bounce back open).
The previous carpenter could just have a habit of doing it every time or he could have needed to, perhaps if the door frame is a bit twisted or the gap between the frame and door is really tight or the screw heads do not sit inside the countersunk holes perfectly, are all reasons to chop the hinges in a little deeper the further away from the face edge you get.
As long as they are flush where they hinge to one another, it shouldn’t affect anything else.
I very rarely need to chop Hines in this way and would prefer to do it only on the frame so on the door they are perfectly flush.
Does that make sense and explain the issue?
Thanks, Gary

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